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Zero Waste Valentines Day Ideas

A lot of people have different opinions about Valentines Day. If you’re someone who likes to show your partner a bit more appreciation than you do any other day of the year, have you considered the effects of the waste produced? From food waste to packaging waste, it all piles up in the build-up to the one day.

So, here are our favourite ideas for a Zero Waste Valentines Day:

Homemade Meal

There’s no need to spend loads of money on a fancy meal at a posh restaurant when you can make your favourite meal at home. You can even go that extra bit further by making something tasty out of your leftovers. I know, that doesn’t sound very appetising, but Love Food Hate Waste has some great recipes made out of leftovers. You could even make a whole three-course meal. Not only will you not be contributing to food waste, but you won’t be physically going out to a restaurant, which means less Co2 emissions created by travelling to a restaurant.

A Shared Experience

Rather than spending money on chocolates, teddys, flowers, etc. Which not only contribute to the waste produced through packaging, they will most likely end up getting thrown away over time. So, why not tick something off the bucket list? Have you always wanted to go sky diving together, or perhaps there is a concert coming up that you both really want to go to. Gifting an experience is a great alternative, and will probably end up being appreciated a lot more. You don’t even need to spend loads of money either, it could be something as simple as Museum tickets.

A Break Away

Similar to a shared experience, you could plan a weekend away together. Travel via public transport such as a train to reduce your emissions, you could even go the extra mile by booking eco and sustainable accommodation.

Potted plants

Rather than gifting a bunch of flowers, which will eventually die and get thrown out, gift a potted flower or plant which you can keep alive.

Nothing

The best way to save the environment this Valentines Day? Do nothing. It’s always a big debate this time of year as to whether you should celebrate Valentines Day or not, a lot of people think it’s pointless. The opinion being that you shouldn’t need one day to show your partner you love them. What do you think, do you celebrate Valentines Day?

 

   

 

Food for Thought.

What happens to your food waste?

Each year the UK Produces approximately 20 million tonnes of food waste. An even more shocking statistic shows that more than 50% of this is still suitable for consumption. That is enough to feed around 30 million average UK Citizens per year. Just with the food that we throw away!

You may think that sending your food waste to landfill is a sustainable option. It is a biodegradable product, and that would make sense, right? Wrong! Once tipped in a landfill it is surrounded by nonorganic material, making it impossible to break down. On top of that, food waste releases methane gas, which is 20 times more powerful than Co2, contributing immensely to climate change. It is incredibly worrying to think that around 20% of solid waste in landfill is food waste product.

Landfill waste

What can you do?

The good news is that it is easy for you to do your bit in making a difference to not just the planet but your pocket too.

Crabs

Crabs shells

Have you ever considered the materials that are reuseable through food waste? For example, crabs. Crab shells can be reprocessed and turned in to Chitin. A plastic-type material which could, in the near future, replace plastic packaging and products.

Have you ever considered how dyes and colourants are created? Certain food types can be reused to produce colourings and flavourings, which diverts them from landfill.

 

 

The options are forever changing and evolving while we continually look for innovation within our sector and out of the box ideas for diverting your waste from landfill.